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20121225
20121225
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
clinton and left washington. she resumed her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenage sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for "the atlantic" magazine, why women still can't have it all. within days the piece became the most read in "the atlantic's" 150-year history. over 1 million views in the first week alone. tonight ann marie slaughter takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job because it's really much more than what many people think. this is a more intense job than a very senior job in the private sector. >> it's certainly comparable. it's an assistant secretary level job which means, you know, you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank and that means you cover the entire world just as she does and you're on for everything she needs you to do and sort of the longer term planning, and you work pretty much around the clock. >> so you're working probably six days a week. >> absolutely.
playing games. right along with the folks in washington. this president is guilty of class warfare. for what? are you kidding me?ma. president obama seems to love rt the drama. i thought he didn't like drama. the reality is that there will be so little impact on our fiscal future. the after all of the drama and whateeer the outcome, we remaih in great jeopardy. because this isn't a fiscals. future. this is not something that any of us want. don't you love it? a lame-duck session of congress. they areon the ones who have to steer us away from the fiscal cliff. joining us tonight, governor jo mike huckabee. , the dumbest spyr had. >> not a good week for spies. dra you add to the the drama with general allan and this ever expanding scandal. it is tragic.heir it is tragic for their families, tragic for all the people who serve with them. tragic for america. lou: and the part that you said where it is tragic foru: us us. in our various institutions, since there are no consequences. sitting in an aircraft, we have a pretty strong light, and this actually the architect and the guy who pr
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)